aerate


aerate
aerate, ventilate, oxygenate, carbonate.
Aerate is the general term and interchangeable in certain phrases with any of the others; the last three are specific terms which are not freely interchangeable with each other. Aerate means to supply or impregnate with air or to expose to the action of air. It frequently implies a mechanical process
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aerate soil by plowing

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aerate sewage by agitation in fresh air

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It sometimes, however, implies a natural process
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the blood is aerated in the lungs

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Ventilate is commonly used when exposure to air especially in large quantities with the object of purifying, freshening, or cooling is implied
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ventilate a room by opening windows

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ventilate an engine by means of holes in its covering

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the patient is unable adequately to ventilate himself with air because air cannot be easily drawn through the air passages, the caliber of which has been diminished by the disease— Science

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It may be indistinguishable from aerate when applied to the blood but usually suggests rather the exposure to air and aerate the resulting gaseous exchange. More exact than either in this relation is oxygenate since it is the oxygen in the air that is required by the blood. Technically aerate and carbonate are not synonyms, for the latter means to impregnate with carbon dioxide but they may overlap when aerate is used broadly with the meaning to impregnate with a gas; hence, aerate or especially aerated is used in certain designations (as aerated water or aerated bread) where carbonated would correctly describe the process.

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Aerate — A [ e]r*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {A[ e]rated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {A[ e]rating}.] [Cf. F. a[ e]rer. See {Air}, v. t.] 1. To combine or charge with gas; usually with carbonic acid gas, formerly called fixed air. [1913 Webster] His sparkling sallies… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • aerate — (v.) 1794, from L. aer (gen. aeris; see AIR (Cf. air) (1)) + verbal suffix ATE (Cf. ate) (2). Related: Aerated; aerating …   Etymology dictionary

  • aerate — ► VERB ▪ introduce air into. DERIVATIVES aeration noun aerator noun. ORIGIN from Latin aer air …   English terms dictionary

  • aerate — [er′āt΄, ā′ər āt΄] vt. aerated, aerating [ AER(O) + ATE1] 1. to expose to air, or cause air to circulate through 2. to supply oxygen to (the blood) by the process of respiration 3. to charge (liquid) with gas, as in making soda water aeration n …   English World dictionary

  • aerate — [[t]e͟əreɪt[/t]] aerates, aerating, aerated VERB To aerate a substance means to cause air or gas to pass through it. [V n] Aerate the soil by spiking with a fork. [V ed] ...fresh crab and lobster, transported south in tanker loads of aerated… …   English dictionary

  • aerate — UK [ˈeəreɪt] / US [ˈeˌreɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms aerate : present tense I/you/we/they aerate he/she/it aerates present participle aerating past tense aerated past participle aerated science a) to force air into a liquid, for example in… …   English dictionary

  • aerate — aeration, n. /air ayt, ay euh rayt /, v.t., aerated, aerating. 1. to expose to the action or effect of air or to cause air to circulate through: to aerate milk in order to remove odors. 2. to change or treat with air or a gas, esp. with carbon… …   Universalium

  • aerate — aer•ate [[t]ˈɛər eɪt, ˈeɪ əˌreɪt[/t]] v. t. at•ed, at•ing 1) phs to expose to the action of air or to cause air to circulate through: Breathe deep to aerate the lungs[/ex] 2) phs to change or treat with air or a gas, esp. with carbon dioxide •… …   From formal English to slang

  • aerate — /ˈɛəreɪt / (say airrayt) verb (t) (aerated, aerating) 1. to charge or treat with air or a gas, especially with carbon dioxide. 2. to expose to the free action of the air: to aerate milk in order to remove unpleasant smells. 3. Physiology to… …   Australian English dictionary

  • aerate — transitive verb (aerated; aerating) Date: 1789 1. to supply or impregnate (as the soil or a liquid) with air 2. to supply (the blood) with oxygen by respiration 3. a. British carbonate 2 b. to make light or sparkling • aeration …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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